The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald Chrom

Gordon Lightfoot

70-е Хроматическая Средняя
Неопределен C Неопределено
The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald (Chromatic) 
Music & Lyrics by Gordon Lightfoot
Key of C Major  Range: C4 – D5
Notations: none=blow  -= draw  *=button in
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0DqPSF2fyo

4  4  -5  4  -3* 3  3  3
3  -3  -3*  -3* -3  3  -2  3
3  -4  3  -2  3  1

3   4  4    4    4
The legend lives on 
-5   4   -3*  3  3  3   3
from the Chip-pe-wa on down 
-3* -3*  -3* -3*  -3*  -3
of  the  big lake they called
 3   -2  3  1
"Git-che Gu-mee."

3   4     4  4  4
The lake, it is said,
-5 4   -3*   3  3   3
Ne-ver gives up her dead
-3*  -3* -3*   -3* -3* -3 3   
when the skies of  No-vem-ber
-2   3    1
turn gloo-my.

3       4   4   4   4
With a load of iron ore 
-5  4  -3* 3   3    3    3
twenty-six thousand tons more
-3*  -3* -3*-3*  -3*  -3   3
than the Ed-mund Fitz-ger-ald
 -2     3   1
weighed emp-ty,

3     4   4     4   4
That good ship and true
-5  4  -3* 3  3   3
was a bone to be chewed
-3*  -3*  -3*   -3* -3* -3 3
when the "Gales of  No-vem-ber" 
-2   3  4
came early. 

3   4    4   4   4 -5
The ship was the pride
4  -3* 3 3   3 3   3
of the A-mer-i-can side
-3* -3* -3*  -3*  -3*  -3
Com-ing back from some mill
3  -2  3   1
in Wis-con-sin.

3  4   4   4     4    4
As the big freighters go,
-5 4   -3* 3   3    3
it was big-ger than most
-3*  -3* -3*  -3* -3*  -3 3
with  a  crew and good captain
-2   3   4
well sea-soned,

3  4  4    4    4 -5
concluding some terms
-5   4  -3*   3   3    3
with a couple of steel firms
-3*  -3*  -3*  -3* -3* -3 3
when they left ful-ly  loaded 
-2  3    1
for Cleveland.

3   4  4    4
And later that
4 -5  4    -3*  3     3    3
night when the ship's bell rang,
-3*   -3* -3* -3* -3*   -3    
could it  be  the north wind 
3      -2   3  4
they'd been feelin'?

4  4  -5  4  -3*  3  3  3 
3  -3  -3* -3  3  -2  3

3   4    4  4
The wind in the 
4 -5  4   -3* 3  3    3   3
wires made a  tattle-tale sound
-3* -3* -3*  -3*  -3* -3  
and a   wave broke ov-er
-2  3  1
the railing.

3   4  4  4   4
And ev'ry man knew, 
-5 4   -3* 3    3   3
as the cap-tain did too
-3*   -3*  -3*  -3* -3* -3 3   
'twas the witch of  No-vem-ber 
-2   3   4
come stealin'.

3   4    4    4
The dawn came late 
-5   4  -3*  3    3   3  3
and the breakfast had to wait
-3*  -3*  -3*  -3* -3* -3 3   
when the Gales of  No-vem-ber 
-2   3  4
came slashin'.

3    4  4   4    4
When af-ter-noon came 
-5  4  -3* 3    3
it was freezin' rain 
-3* -3*  -3*  -3* -3* -3 3  -2   
in  the  face of  a  hur-ri-cane
3    4
west wind.

4  4  -5  4  -3* 3  3  3
3  -3  -3*  -3* -3  3  -2  3  4
-3  -3  3*  3  -4  3  -2  3  1

3    4  4  4    4
When suppertime came 
-5  4   -3*  3    3  3    3   -3*
the old cook came on deck say-in'.
-3* -3*  -3*  -3* -3 3   
"Fellas, it's too rough
-2 3    1
 t'feed ya."

3  4 4   4  4
At seven P. M. 
-5 4    -3*  3   3     3
 a main hatchway caved in; 
-3* -3*   -3*  -3*  -3*  -3  3                   
he  said, "Fel-las, it's bin good
-2 3   4
t'know ya!"


3   4  4    4     4
The captain wired in 
-5 4   -3* 3   3     3
he had wa-ter comin' in
-3* -3* -3*  -3*  -3* -3   3   
and the good ship and crew was
-2 3   1
in per-il.

3   4  4    4    4
And later that night 
-5    4  -3*    3    3  3  3
when 'is lights went outta sight
-3*  -3*  -3*  -3* -3* -3 3
came the wreck of  the Ed-mund
-2  3  4
Fitzgerald.

4  4  -5  4  -3* 3  3  3
3  -3  -3*  -3* -3  3  -2  3  4
-3  -3  3*  3  -4  3  -2  3  1

3     4  4   4
Does any one know 
-5     4  -3*  3   3    3
where the love of God goes
-3*  -3*  -3*  -3* -3* -3 3   
when the waves turn the minutes
-2 3  1
to hours?

3   4  4      4    4
The searchers all say
-5   4  -3*   3   3    3   3
they'd have made Whitefish Bay
-3*  -3*  -3* -3* -3* -3   3   
if they'd put fifteen more miles 
-2 3    4
behind 'er.

3    4     4    4     4
They might have split up 
-5  4   -3*   3    3  3
or they might have capsized;
-3*  -3*  -3*  -3*  -3   
they may have broke deep 
3   -2   3 1
and took water.

3   4  4    4    4
And all that remains 
-5   4  -3*   3   3    3
is the faces and the names
-3* -3* -3*   -3* -3* -3
of  the wives and the sons 
3   -2  3    4
and the daughters.

4  4  -5  4  -3* 3  3  3
3  -3  -3*  -3* -3  3  -2  3  4
-3  -3  3*  3  -4  3  -2  3  1

3    4  4
Lake Huron 
4 -5   4  -3* 3 3   3
rolls, Su-per-i-or sings
-3* -3* -3*  -3* -3*
in the rooms of her 
-3  3 -2  3  1
ice-water mansion.

3   4   4   4  4
Old Mi-chi-gan steams 
-5   4 -3*   3      3
like a young man's dreams;
-3* -3* -3*  -3* -3*  -3  -2
the is-lands and bays are for
3    4
sportsmen.

3   4  4    4  4
And farther be-low 
-5   4 -3* 3  3
Lake On-ta-ri-o 
-3*   -3* -3*  -3*  -3 3   
takes in  what Lake Er-ie 
-2  3    1
can send her,

3   4   4    4     4
But the iron boats go 
-5 4   -3* 3    3    3
as the mariners all know
-3*  -3*  -3*  -3* -3* -3 3   
with the Gales of  No-vem-ber 
-2 3   4
Re-mem-bered.

4  4  -5  4  -3* 3  3  3
3  -3  -3*  -3* -3  3  -2  3  4
-3  -3  3*  3  -4  3  -2  3  1
4  4  -5  4  -3* 3  3  3
3  -3  -3*  -3* -3  3  -2  3  4
-3  -3  3*  3  -4  3  -2  3  1

3  4 4   4  4   4
In a mus-ty old hall 
-5 4  -3* 3   3    3
in De-tro-it they prayed,
-3* -3* -3* -3* -3* -3 3   
in  the "Mar-i-time Sailors' 
-2 3   1
Ca-the-dral."

3   4      4    4
The church bell chimed 
-5   4  -3*  3      3    3
'til it rang twenty-nine times
-3* -3*  -3* -3* -3*
for each man on the 
-3 3    -2  3  4
Ed-mund Fitzgerald.

3   4  4    4    4
The legend lives on 
-5   4   -3*  3  3  3   3
From the Chip-pe-wa on down
-3* -3* -3* -3*  -3*  -3    
of  the big lake they call
 3   -2  3  1
"Git-che Gu-mee."

 3  4   4     4    4
"Su-per-ior," they said, 
-5 4   -3*   3   3    3
"never gives up her dead
-3*  -3* -3*  -3* -3* -3 3   
when the gales of No-vem-ber 
-2   3  4
come early!"

4  4  -5  4  -3* 3  3  3
3  -3  -3*  -3* -3  3  -2  3  4
-3  -3  3*  3  -4  3  -2  3  1
4  4  -5  4  -3* 3  3  3
3  -3  -3*  -3* -3  3  -2  3  4
-3  -3  3*  3  -4  3  -2  3  1(sustain)

Добавил: ?, 2011.11.05

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